The ColecoVision

ColecoVision

ColecoVision - The Arcade In Your Home!

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Coleco 1982

Wishing Upon a Telstar

The Connecticut Leather Company is founded in West Hartford, Connecticut by Russian immigrant Maurice Greenberg in 1932, selling shoe repair supplies out of a shop on Market Street. Joining the family business after graduating from Hartford’s Trinity College with a Bachelor of Science degree in mathematics in 1948, his son Leonard champions a move to leather craft kits featuring character licensing from the likes of Disney and Howdy Doody. He also moves the company into vacuum form plastic molding in 1957 and sells off the leather business as their plastic products like sandboxes and toboggans go soaring off store shelves. Shortening their name to Coleco in 1961, by the end of the decade they are the largest manufacturer of above-ground swimming pools. Lawyer Arnold Greenberg joins his father and brother in 1966, and Coleco makes its first move into games two years later by acquiring Eagle Toys, a Canadian maker of popular rod hockey tables that becomes Coleco Canada. The company becomes a publicly traded entity on the NYSE in 1971, and Maurice’s two sons Leonard and Arnold  take the helm in 1973, with Leonard handling the manufacturing and engineering side and Arnold covering the finances and marketing. In a quest for diversification, Coleco flirts with bankruptcy due to some shaky forays into snowmobile and dirt bike production. As the success of Atari’s PONG arcade game opens up a new genre of entertainment, however, the Greenbergs figure moving their tabletop hockey games onto the home TV would be a hit. The release of its million-seller $49.95 Telstar home PONG clone in 1976 gives Coleco a taste of the profits to be had in electronic video games, and it thirsts for more. The company produces nine more varieties of the Telstar unit, nearly bankrupting itself again in 1978 as the home videogame market moves over to programmable, cartridge based game units. With Pong-type game manufacturers slashing the price of their dedicated consoles up to 75%, Coleco is forced to dump over a million obsolete Telstar machines at a cost of 22.3 million dollars.

Image of Coleco's Telstar, a home video game console 1976

Box for Telstar, Coleco’s PONG clone, 1976

Head to Head Baseball, a hand-held electronic game by Coleco, 1980

1980 image of Head to Head Baseball

The Third Wave

Coleco’s line of electronic handheld sports games such as Electronic Quarterback and the Head-to-Head series help keep the company afloat in the late 70′s, with $200 million in sales for the devices posted in 1979. This leads the brothers to ignore the near disaster experienced with the Telstar PONG clones and fund a new R&D video game division to the tune of $1.5 million. The team is led by Eric Bromley, who has experience under his belt heading the R&D departments of coin-op companies such as Midway. Bromley’s team is charged to develop a new third-generation home videogame system, one that will set the standard in graphics quality, performance, and expandability. Bromley himself had done preliminary work in designing and costing a system several years earlier, but the high cost of RAM kept an advanced console out of reach.

By 1981, however, RAM prices have dropped dramatically, so much so that the project is now within range of the target price-point set by Coleco. Bromley and Arnold Greenberg hash out the specs of the new system, giving it the placeholder moniker of ColecoVision until the marketing types can think up a better one. They never do, so the name sticks. The new system is based around an 8-bit 3.58 MHz Z80A CPU, with 1K of RAM and 8K ROM.  Also on-board is the powerful Texas Instruments TMS9918A video controller chip, giving the system 16K of video RAM and allowing a screen resolution of 256×192. It has the capability to display 32 sprites on-screen at the same time, along with a 16 colour on-screen palette out of a total of 32. Three channel sound via the TI SN76489 sound generator chip is also thrown into the mix for good measure. The console’s cartridges are 32K, the most memory of any system currently on the market.

Probably the greatest promise of longevity of the ColecoVision, however, comes from the large port in the front of the box covered by a sliding panel, called the Expansion Module Interface. Into this maw is where purchasers will plug in the many add-on modules planned to be released for the system.

 

The ColecoVision is a sturdy looking device, a large black box with two controllers that follow the Intellivision‘s lead by allowing overlays to be inserted over a 12 button membrane keypad. But the system splits the difference between the joysticks of the VCS and the control disk of the Intellivision by having a short, thumb-busting mushroom-shaped stick which proves to be too imprecise for most gamers. At one point in the prototype stage, there are fly-wheel spinners called “speed rollers” included on the controllers, for greater player precision or throttle control in some games. Due to mechanical issues, these are dropped from the design, to resurface again in the later released Super Action Controllers by Coleco. Their omission might also be attributed to the fact that they make the ColecoVision controllers, already outrageously large in smaller hands, even bigger. The machine’s durable cartridges come with connecting boards that are designed to withstand 10,000 insertions into the console cartridge slot, the equivalent of inserting a cart three times a day, every day, for ten years. Probably the greatest promise of longevity of the ColecoVision, however, comes from the large port in the front of the box covered by a sliding panel, called the Expansion Module Interface. Into this maw is where purchasers will plug in the many add-on modules planned to be released for the system. It is Coleco’s insatiable desire to fill this hole that will eventually lead it, and the ColecoVision system, to destruction.

 

Koming with Kong

The key to the success of this new machine is to be its pack-in cartridge, an adaptation of the smash arcade hit Donkey Kong. Coleco sends Bromley over to Japan to negotiate the rights, where imposing Nintendo chairman Hiroshi Yamauchi presents him with an ultimatum. Either agree to a pay Nintendo a $2 royalty per cartridge sold and wire a $200,000 advance by the end of the day or risk losing the license to either Atari or Mattel, both of whom are scratching at the door looking to buy. Bromley makes the call to Greenberg and convinces him that the rights to the biggest hit since Pac-Man are within their grasp. A verbal agreement to the Donkey Kong license is made. Bromley later gets a scare when Nintendo informs him they have changed their minds and decided to give Atari the license, but an impassioned plea to Yamauchi persuades the usually iron-willed Nintendo president to stick with the original Coleco deal and grant Atari only the home computer rights.

Coleco’s tight adaptation of Donkey Kong for the ColecoVision, of course, becomes one of the greatest system-sellers in video game history. There will not be a game bundled with a console more effective at showcasing the strengths of the system until 2006 when Nintendo includes Wii Sports with the Wii. Later on, in 1982, lawsuits are filed against both Nintendo and Coleco by Universal Studios, claiming Donkey Kong infringes on their King Kong copyright. With the large sum of money already invested in the license looming in their minds, Coleco cuts a deal with Universal, giving them 3 percent of Donkey Kong sales. Nintendo, however, fights the lawsuit, offering numerous in-court demonstrations of gameplay vs. movie plot. Manhattan District Court Judge D. J. Sweet eventually rules that Donkey Kong has “a totally different concept and feel from the drama” and that “no reasonable jury could find likelihood of confusion”. It is also discovered the fact that MCA Universal has let their copyright to King Kong lapse anyway. After appeals, all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, in 1984 Universal loses the case and Nintendo is awarded $1.8 million in damages. This prompts Coleco to then file suit and receive a portion of their lost royalties. Donkey Kong is also released for the VCS/2600 by Coleco, in early 1983. Game design is contracted out to small engineering and development house Wickstead Design Associates, where Garry Kitchen programs the hotly anticipated title. His version of Nintendo’s arcade hit sells over 4 million copies on Atari’s ubiquitous game platform. Kitchen will eventually end up joining his brothers at Activision.

 

That Arcade Quality

Along with Donkey Kong, twelve additional cartridges are announced along with the ColecoVision. While Atari had pioneered the licensing of arcade games for home play with Space Invaders, Coleco makes this a key part of their strategy, aggressively seeking licenses for coin-op games instead of concentrating on creating original titles. Outside of the pack-in cartridge, the first batch of arcade conversions are Lady Bug, Mouse Trap, Venture, Carnival, Cosmic Avenger, TurboSpace Fury and Zaxxon. Three Exidy games are also announced as arcade conversions, but ultimately cancelled: Side Trak, Spectar and Rip Cord. The department inside Coleco developing these translations is staffed by around 30 artists, designers and programmers at start up. Once the rights to an arcade game is secured for the ColecoVision, the design team receives an arcade unit that joins its brethren in the “game room”. Lacking any technical source material, the game designers at Coleco must videotape gameplay from the coin-op version for reference while translating the game. The usual timeframe for development of a game at Coleco is three to four months. While the conversions are not flawless interpretations, they are one giant step towards capturing the graphics and game mechanics of the original coin-op for play at home. One fly in the ointment, however, is the seemingly interminable (at least for an anxious kid desperately waiting to play the game) ten-second or so delay between turning on the console with a cartridge inserted, and the game selection screen showing up. This can be chalked up to Coleco wanting to get as many arcade game hits out on their game machine as possible; the initial suite of games for the ColecoVision are programmed in PASCAL, an easier language to create in than the machine language the Z80 CPU natively deals in. While this allows for speedy development, the console must put the brakes on and parse the information from the cartridge at the start of each of each new play session.

Foldout for Zaxxon, a video game for the ColecoVision

Foldout for ColecoVision Zaxxon game

 

After its February debut at the Toy Industry Association’s Toy Fair in New York City, the ColecoVision is released in late-summer of 1982, at a retail cost of $199. Hitting the market in the midst of the public relations war Atari and Mattel are waging against each other, Coleco’s new system sells for around 50 dollars more than the 2600 but also 50 dollars less than Mattel’s Intellivision. Distribution of the powerhouse console outside of North America is handled by CBS Electronics. The ColecoVision is an instant success, with the first run of 550,000 machines selling out by Christmas 1982. In the first quarter of 1983, Coleco reports that one million of the devices have been sold in total, along with eight million cartridges. Coleco stock enjoys an amazing run, named the best performer on the NYSE for 1982, increasing from 6 7/8 to 36 3/4 over the year. Helping the balance sheet along is the incredible reception of Coleco’s electronic tabletop replicas of arcade games, including Pac-Man, Donkey Kong and Galaxian. Even with over 200,000 units coming off the production line by 1982, early in the year, Coleco must withdraw their TV ad campaign for these devices in the NYC area due to a lack of ability to keep up with demand. The company’s performance on the stock exchange leads the New York Times to name Coleco as one of its 10 Super Stocks of 1982. Sales revenue for the company has tripled from $178 million in 1981 to $510 million through 1982.

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Comments >>

  1. avatarRalf

    Great article showing the spirit of these consoles. Today Coleco, Intellivison and Atari still have plenty of fans supporting these systems. As old tv’s fade away and people are surrounded by hightech gadgets these old consoles are still attractive if updated: Stereo/Surround sound, AV/Composite video output are state of the art creating new game experience even with old games. If you hear the stereo/surround sound from such an old console you are really surprised how great these games are.

    Specially as modern consoles sucks in gameplay and complexity (today you need about 15-30 minute to get warm or update your PS3/P4) quick and easy games are really a runner (for the masses on smartphones/tables). So we may see the dying of dedicated gaming consoles very soon, still living on tables and phones.

    Reply
    1. avatarWilliam

      I think the latest consoles that were just released as I am writing this, the Xbox One and PS4, really mitigate the issues with long start-up times and having to constantly update them. They have systems in place, such as background updating, that put an end to this kind of thing.

      Mobile gaming has certainly come to the fore recently, but I don’t think it will be replacing dedicated game consoles quite yet.

      Reply
  2. avatarRalf

    If you look around you will see people having less time today. So filling the limited spare time with a quick game is what happened (for example during public transport, in a break etc.). You do not have a full blown console with you but you still carry a smartphone or tablet with you… that’s the big difference. I have plenty of games at home for all kind of current consoles but there are a lot I never played and they are still in original cover due to time issues. Last time I want to play with my girlfriend on my PS3 the update of the console itself and the game took 45 minutes alone (!!!). Well not so tell we waited a while and then switching over to watch a movie ;-(

    Reply
  3. avatarW. J. Brookes

    What an excellent article. This in one of the few write-ups that really gives readers a sense of what it was like when the ColecoVision was released. You captured it really well. I know, because I got one of these amazing machines when it was first released (thanks Dad).

    Yeah, the ColecoVision was quite the machine. I seem to recall playing it so much that I wore out my tendons. The time away from the machine while healing was tough. Later I noticed Nintendo gamers coined the phrase “Nintendo thumb”. I totally understood what they were talking about.

    For those that have never tried a ColecoVision, your best bet is the stuff they ported over in-house (as opposed to a lot of the 3rd-party games — which usually sucked). So for a list of gooders, check out:

    - Donkey Kong Jr. (Super Donkey Kong Jr. includes all levels from the arcade version)
    - Frenzy
    - Time Pilot
    - Venture
    - Zaxxon
    - Cosmic Avenger
    - Q*Bert

    Note: This machine is the same spec as the SEGA SG-1000. So for a similar experience, try the following SG-1000 games:
    - Galaga
    - Golgo 13
    - Hustle Chummy
    - Star Force
    - Elevator Action
    - Exerion

    Reply
    1. avatarWilliam

      Thanks for the kind words about the article.

      As noted in the article, I had a ColecoVision myself, and it was nothing short of a spectacular games console. I know exactly what you mean about straining your hands with the stiff mushroom stick, I’m sure it put a lot of kids’ hands out of commission.

      Out of the games you list for CV, Venture and Zaxxon were probably my favourites. I remember really liking Mousetrap too, it was a nice strategic take on all the Pac-Man games that were out at the time. And of course, the Donkey Kong game that came packed with the system was a revelation.

      Thanks again for writing!

      Reply

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